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Influenza can have a devastating impact on adults 65 years and older1

While influenza impacts millions of people in the US,2 it disproportionately affects adults 65 years and older.1 flu360™ can help address the vaccine needs of those 65 years and older.

In the US, influenza impacts adults 65+ with high hospitalization and death rates.1

The CDC estimates that each year, adults 65+ account for approximately1:

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50%-70%
of influenza-related hospitalizations

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70%-85%
of influenza-related deaths

What are the influenza-related complications?

up to

80%

of adults 65+ live with multiple chronic health conditions, many of which are associated with increased risk of influenza-related complications.*3,4

In the first weeks after influenza infection, adults 65+ have an increased risk of:


A first or subsequent
heart attack:

up to

3-5 times

more likely5

A first or subsequent
stroke:

up to

2-3 times

more likely5

Developing pneumonia and bronchitis, the most common complications of influenza5,6

*2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Data (MEPS) from the Agency
for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Flu vaccination in older adult patient
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In many recent seasons, vaccine effectiveness has been suboptimal in adults 65+ compared to younger adults.† 7-10

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Data estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2016-2020

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References.1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Flu & people 65 years and older. Accessed February 12, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/highrisk/65over.htm 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Disease burden of influenza. Accessed October 20, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/ about/burden/index.html 3. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Multiple chronic conditions chartbook: 2010 medical expenditure panel survey data. Published April 2014. Accessed September 12, 2020. https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/wysiwyg/professionals/prevention-chronic-care/decision/mcc/mccchartbook.pdf 4. McElhaney JE, Kuchel GA, Zhou X, Swain SL, Haynes L. T-cell immunity to influenza in older adults: a pathophysiological framework for development of more effective vaccines. Front Immunol. 2016 7:41. doi:10.3389/fimmu.2016.00041 5. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. Call to action: reinvigorating influenza prevention in US adults age 65 and older. Published September 2016. Accessed September 12, 2020. https://www.nfid.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/flu-older-adults.pdf 6. Rothberg MB, Haessler SD, Brown RB. Complications of viral influenza. Am J Med. 2008 121(4):258-264. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2007.10.0 7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness, 2016-2017. Accessed October 1, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/vaccines-work/2016-2017.html 8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness, 2017-2018. Accessed October 1, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/vaccines-work/2017-2018.html 9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. US flu VE data for 2018-2019. Accessed August 19, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/vaccines-work/2018-2019.html 10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. US flu VE data for 2019-2020. Accessed March 4, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/vaccines-work/2019-2020.html